Topics

WebHelp test server for DITA project #Oxygen #HTML5

Matt Lorenzi
 

I am looking for some technical information for a Webhelp test environment. I am looking to showcase Webhelp produced with OxygenXML Author to internal stakeholders.
What kind of server setup would be best for a testing environment; also would I need a publishing client to publish to the host?

I realize this is not really DITA specific, but since I am writing in a DITA environment using OxygenXML, this would be a good place to ask. Also I need to give my IT people some technical sounding information to help move this along.

Thomas Rathkamp
 

We use Sharepoint, mainly because it was already in use for other purposes where I work.  



Tom Rathkamp
Senior Technical Writer




On Tuesday, March 24, 2020, 03:24:24 PM CDT, Matt Lorenzi via Groups.Io <mjlorenzi@...> wrote:


I am looking for some technical information for a Webhelp test environment. I am looking to showcase Webhelp produced with OxygenXML Author to internal stakeholders.
What kind of server setup would be best for a testing environment; also would I need a publishing client to publish to the host?

I realize this is not really DITA specific, but since I am writing in a DITA environment using OxygenXML, this would be a good place to ask. Also I need to give my IT people some technical sounding information to help move this along.

Matt Lorenzi
 

I'm not sure, how easy is it to publish a website to Sharepoint?

Radu Coravu
 

Hi Matt,

One solution is to have an internal server with an Apache HTTP Server or ‪Firefly‬ installed on it to serve your static HTML pages.

Another solution is to use a hosted solution like Netlify. You create an account in Netlify using your gmail address for example and if you have on the local disk the folder containing the WebHelp HTML output you can drag and drop it in the web page:

https://app.netlify.com/drop

Netlify can also be used to automate the publishing of DITA content to outputs like WebHelp or PDF and it can connect to a GitHub repository with DITA content, detect changes in it and launch a publishing script to automatically update the published outputs, like I did for the Oxygen XML Blog:

https://oxygenxmlblog.netlify.com/topics/welcome.html

Regards,

Radu

Radu Coravu
Oxygen XML Editor
On 3/24/20 10:24 PM, Matt Lorenzi via Groups.Io wrote:

I am looking for some technical information for a Webhelp test environment. I am looking to showcase Webhelp produced with OxygenXML Author to internal stakeholders.
What kind of server setup would be best for a testing environment; also would I need a publishing client to publish to the host?

I realize this is not really DITA specific, but since I am writing in a DITA environment using OxygenXML, this would be a good place to ask. Also I need to give my IT people some technical sounding information to help move this along.


  

Thomas Rathkamp
 

Hi Matt,

IT set it up for me but I do not think it was that involved.  It is connected to One Drive so I can upload updates via Windows Explorer. If your company does not use Sharepoint, then I would definitely look into Radu's suggestions in his reply to you. 

Tom Rathkamp
Senior Technical Writer




On Tuesday, March 24, 2020, 10:16:59 PM CDT, Matt Lorenzi via Groups.Io <mjlorenzi@...> wrote:


I'm not sure, how easy is it to publish a website to Sharepoint?

Matt Lorenzi
 

Thanks to both of you, this should give me enough for IT to do something with. Yes we do use Sharepoint and One Drive so that may be a solution.

Ben McGinnes
 

On Wed, Mar 25, 2020 at 07:31:17AM +0200, Radu Coravu wrote:
Hi Matt,

One solution is to have an internal server with an Apache HTTP
Server or ‪Firefly‬ installed on it to serve your static HTML pages.
Always a good option for local only stuff, like in this case.

Netlify can also be used to automate the publishing of DITA content
to outputs like WebHelp or PDF and it can connect to a GitHub
repository with DITA content, detect changes in it and launch a
publishing script to automatically update the published outputs,
like I did for the Oxygen XML Blog:

https://oxygenxmlblog.netlify.com/topics/welcome.html
That's really quite a nifty solution for the type of organisations or
projects which would need something a bit flashier for the middle
management audience.

Still, it's worth mentioning that there's even easier and simpler
options for deploying locally written DITA content to a cheap and
reliable hosting service. One which (mostly) requires very little
original configuration (usually depending on whether or not to use
your own domain or subdomain with a CNAME or not).

The one I've used in the past for various things, including some DITA
generated HTML content, is AWS S3 servers. AWS provide API access to
S3 and there are plenty of SDKs for accessing it, which the CLI tools
(written in Python) use too.

So automating uploading an entire directory structure should be quite
straight forward. I'm always on POSIX systems, so I don't see any
need to use much more than a few quick shell commands to upload files
(possibly recursively) that are publicly readable and it's done.

Still, I suppose it wouldn't take too much effort to write something
platform independent that would just walk through the entire directory
structure and then do the same. I'd choose the same weapon Amazon did
for botocore, Python (and thus benefit from their module); but I'm
sure you could do it in Java and turn it into a plugin, or whatever.

Note: don't do that on my account, I'm *really* unlikely to ever use
it over one of my own scripts for things specific to my subdomains.

For those people with some little VPS already out in the world and
since it's already there (and less likely to run into traffic volume
issues, if it's an option at all); ssh and rsync are your friends, or
alternatively scp.


Regards,
Ben